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The FISH pantries often distribute whole chickens provided to us by the USDA.  Sometimes, the thought of what to do with a whole chicken can feel overwhelming but the good news is, with some simple preparation, a whole chicken can provide 3 pounds of chicken, enough for 3 dinners!

Step 1:  thaw your chicken.  The best way to thaw a whole chicken is in your refrigerator though it can take 24 hours or more. The chicken should go inside a pan with a lip, to avoid any spills.  

Step 2:  
Remove the chicken giblets. Rinse the chicken inside and out.  

Step 3:  Choose your method

OVEN:  Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Roast the chicken for 1 1/2 hours, or until the juices run clear when you cut between a leg and thigh.

CROCKPOT:   Put the chicken in the slow cooker breast-side up.  Put the cover over the slow cooker. If you want the chicken to cook faster, set the slow cooker to the High setting and let the chicken cook for 3 1/2 hours. If youre not in a rush, set the slow cooker to Low and let the chicken cook for 4 1/2 to 5 hours.

Always check internal heat is 165 °F and let chicken rest for 15 minutes before cutting or shredding.

The cooking time can change depending on the size of the chicken. If your chicken is heavier or lighter than usual, adjust the cooking time accordingly.

Easy meal ideas include shredded chicken tacos, Chicken Satay Noodles, Chicken Cobb Salad, Chicken Casserole, Enchiladas, Chicken Pot Pie, Chicken Peanut Noodles and so many more.  

Most of these recipes can be made with our fully cooked shelf-stable chicken pouches or canned chicken which are also readily available at the pantry!

We expect to see increased food pantry use in the coming months as families enrolled in SNAP brace for a significant cut in benefits.

Beginning in March, no more EA funds will be distributed to SNAP beneficiaries. The Food Research & Action Center warned that the end to emergency allotments could cause a “hunger cliff for millions of people.”

We hope to help our clients stretch their food budgets and make the most of the groceries we offer at the pantry.  

Over the next weeks, watch our page for helpful hints on keeping your produce fresh, stretching your protein and making the most of the shelf-stable items we offer.

The FISH pantries often distribute whole chickens provided to us by the USDA. Sometimes, the thought of what to do with a whole chicken can feel overwhelming but the good news is, with some simple preparation, a whole chicken can provide 3 pounds of chicken, enough for 3 dinners!

Step 1: thaw your chicken. The best way to thaw a whole chicken is in your refrigerator though it can take 24 hours or more. The chicken should go inside a pan with a lip, to avoid any spills.

Step 2:
Remove the chicken giblets. Rinse the chicken inside and out.

Step 3: Choose your method

OVEN: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Roast the chicken for 1 1/2 hours, or until the juices run clear when you cut between a leg and thigh.

CROCKPOT: Put the chicken in the slow cooker breast-side up. Put the cover over the slow cooker. If you want the chicken to cook faster, set the slow cooker to the 'High' setting and let the chicken cook for 3 1/2 hours. If you're not in a rush, set the slow cooker to 'Low' and let the chicken cook for 4 1/2 to 5 hours.

Always check internal heat is 165 °F and let chicken rest for 15 minutes before cutting or shredding.

The cooking time can change depending on the size of the chicken. If your chicken is heavier or lighter than usual, adjust the cooking time accordingly.

Easy meal ideas include shredded chicken tacos, Chicken Satay Noodles, Chicken Cobb Salad, Chicken Casserole, Enchiladas, Chicken Pot Pie, Chicken Peanut Noodles and so many more.

Most of these recipes can be made with our fully cooked shelf-stable chicken pouches or canned chicken which are also readily available at the pantry!

We expect to see increased food pantry use in the coming months as families enrolled in SNAP brace for a significant cut in benefits.

Beginning in March, no more EA funds will be distributed to SNAP beneficiaries. The Food Research & Action Center warned that the end to emergency allotments could cause a “hunger cliff for millions of people.”

We hope to help our clients stretch their food budgets and make the most of the groceries we offer at the pantry.

Over the next weeks, watch our page for helpful hints on keeping your produce fresh, stretching your protein and making the most of the shelf-stable items we offer.
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If you participate in our Senior Nutrition lunches, we hope you will take a few moments to fill out our survey!  We love knowing which meals are your favorites and what could use improvement.  

Meals on Wheels clients have received surveys from their drivers but if you come to the dining room to eat, wed appreciate your time!  Youll find the surveys at the check-in desk.

If you participate in our Senior Nutrition lunches, we hope you will take a few moments to fill out our survey! We love knowing which meals are your favorites and what could use improvement.

Meals on Wheels clients have received surveys from their drivers but if you come to the dining room to eat, we'd appreciate your time! You'll find the surveys at the check-in desk.
... See MoreSee Less

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Food Bank Food Pantry

Open Table Meals

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“We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men.” – Herman Melville

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